Tuesday, 06 April 2010 04:27

Lemon Law - Dont be a Victim

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Lemon laws differ from state to state across America, although the very basics of the law are standard throughout the United States. They were implemented to protect the consumer.

In a lifetime the purchase of a vehicle is probably the second most biggest purchase a regular consumer will make, and thus the lemon laws have been designed with the aim to prevent any wrong doings or faults occurring after a sale from a trusted manufacturer or dealership. Lemon laws differ from state to state across America, although the very basics of the law are standard throughout the United States.

The lemon law allows consumers a standard definition of what considers a vehicle to be classed as a lemon. The law also states that the manufacturer is to be held responsible for problems and additionally continues to define how matters should be handled when a lemon is in involved. The lemon laws set up a warranty period that is usually between a 12 and 24 month period. As well as this it also specifies how many attempts must be made to correct the defect before a refund or replacement is ordered. Generally serious defects that would affect the safety and security of passengers whilst in the vehicle are only granted one attempt to the dangerous error. Defects of a substantially lesser value are allowed three attempts. When a refund has been issued there are dedications for use of the vehicle, usually correlating with the number of miles on the vehicle. Not every vehicles situation qualifies under the lemon law, so checking one local state regulation is important in determining whether or not one can instruct the use of the law.

Once a consumer is aware of their situation within the lemon law, there are several steps that should be instructed. Repairs have an important legal part of the lemon law, as previously mentioned, and here are a certain number of attempts allowed to try to repair the defect. It is essentially very important that the consumer keeps good repair records to prove the attempts have been made. The manufacturer must always been in the picture and informed of any repairs that have been carried out or attempted to be carried out. It should be then that you are set up to receive a refund or replacement. High stats show that the manufacturer will quite often disagree with you, and thus the consumer may have to go to court to resolve the matter.

More information on Lemon Law can be found at the author's website at http://www.lemonlaws.co.uk

Read 483 times Last modified on Saturday, 10 April 2010 06:21
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